There’s the portion of the software that shows your bank transactions

and those are going to be exactly what the bank sends to Quicken. So if the bank has a single savings account with a lump sum in it, that’s exactly what it’s going to send to Quicken and that’s what you’ll see in the register. Having said that, there are other sections of Quicken which allow you to set up spending budgets, spending histories, and set/track goals. Given what you’ve said, I think exploring those other sections would be worthwhile. In previous editions of Quicken the budgeting section allowed you to do most of what you’re talking about, but in Quicken 2013 some of those options changed. I don’t know if Quicken 2014 restored those options, changed them again, or kept everything the same. But try to think of Quicken as serving two different purposes – a ledger to record what actually happened, and a planning tool to figure out what to do in the future. Those two sections don’t always talk to each other but you can usually figure out how to accomplish your goals in either one or the other.